Hungary honours Nobel laureate, Rubik’s cube inventor

Budapest, Aug 20 (IANS): Hungarian President Janos Ader presented Nobel laureate author Imre Kertesz and inventor Erno Rubik with the Order of Saint Stephen, Hungary’s highest award, Wednesday.

The award marks the country’s most important national holiday, Saint Stephen’s Day. Saint Stephen or Stephen I was the founder king of Hungary and reigned from 1000 to 1038 A.D.

Kertesz won the Nobel Prize for literature in 2002 “for writing that upholds the fragile experience of the individual against the barbaric arbitrariness of history”, the Nobel Committee wrote. Kertesz, a Jew, was deported to the Auschwitz concentration camp at age 14. His writing reflects that experience.

Ader said Kertesz deserved this award for his complete oeuvre, which fully describes what dictatorships do to the human soul, Xinhua reported. He particularly thanked Kertesz for his daring and honesty as a writer.

Rubik is an inventor, architect and professor of architecture, best known internationally for inventing mechanical puzzles including Rubik’s Cube, which was originally designed as a teaching aid. His recent work has been focused on promoting science in education.

Presenting the award, Ader called the cube an ingenious invention, so quirky and enchanting that a Hungarian mindset was needed to come up with it.

The Order of Saint Stephen is granted in recognition of exceptionally outstanding contributions in supporting Hungary, extraordinary oeuvres and significant international achievement.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban and Speaker of Parliament Laszlo Kover were also present at the awards ceremony.

Source: Daiji World

Rubik’s Cube Fridge at ThinkGeek

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It certainly isn’t going to keep your big supermarket shop cool, but that’s not stopping us admiring this Rubik’s Cube Fridge at ThinkGeek.

It’s an exclusive at that particular retailer, offering to keep smaller items cool or warm (depending on the setting you choose), but not able to twist and turn like the real thing. That would have been just too good. It’ll add a certain something to a room though, even if it’s just a talking point.

The fried is officially licensed and works via mains or with a DC power cord for use on the go (in the car, for example). It sells for $149.99 (around £88).

Find out more

Rubik’s cube lamp

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Back in 2009 we saw a concept for a Rubik’s Cube lamp that can be made to change the color of its light by moving its faces around. The recently released official Rubik’s Cube lamp shines only white light, but you can actually rotate its faces and solve it if you want. “And that’s a big if,” said a billion forgotten Rubik’s Cubes stashed in drawers and attics all over the world.

The lamp has a battery that lasts up to 2 hours per charge so you can play it while it’s lit up. It also comes with a display stand that doubles as a USB charging dock.

This Rubik’s Cube-Like Device Will Help You Never Miss a Notification

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Sometimes, putting your phone on silent means you can easily miss a call, text, or other important message. Sure, there’s the vibrate function but even that’s easy to miss at times. LEDmeKnow aims to stop that problem by ensuring you can take a glance at it and know exactly who’s trying to reach you.

It’s a form of smart lightbox that offers up a series of squares, each representing a different person, group of people, type of contact, or app. Looking kind of like a Rubik’s Cube, it means you can take a glance at the lights and know exactly what’s going on. The device works for any app possible meaning there’s plenty of flexibility. Just think how it would help when tracking calls, emails, texts, Skype, WhatsApp, Facebook, and many more. It could be particularly handy after leaving your phone on silent overnight and wanting to check at a glance if you’ve missed anything.

Sometimes, putting your phone on silent means you can easily miss a call, text, or other important message. Sure, there’s the vibrate function but even that’s easy to miss at times. LEDmeKnow aims to stop that problem by ensuring you can take a glance at it and know exactly who’s trying to reach you.

It’s a form of smart lightbox that offers up a series of squares, each representing a different person, group of people, type of contact, or app. Looking kind of like a Rubik’s Cube, it means you can take a glance at the lights and know exactly what’s going on. The device works for any app possible meaning there’s plenty of flexibility. Just think how it would help when tracking calls, emails, texts, Skype, WhatsApp, Facebook, and many more. It could be particularly handy after leaving your phone on silent overnight and wanting to check at a glance if you’ve missed anything.

LEDmeKnow can display up to nine different events simultaneously, using Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy Protocol to ensure it only needs to be charged once a month.

The device is currently available via a Kickstarter campaign. Pledges that involve receiving a LEDmeKnow start at $60 for one with two LEDmeKnows available for $115. The latter combination being ideal for both your home and workplace set up.

The Kickstarter campaign has until July 25 to run so get in there quickly.

Read more at PasteMagazine

Rubik’s Cube will be dragged down the Hudson River

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A giant inflatable Rubik’s Cube will be tugged along the Hudson River Friday in honor of the popular and brutally challenging toy’s 40th anniversary.
The 20-by-20 foot cube is set to sail off Staten Island at 6 a.m. and pass by some of NYC’s most notable landmarks. Carried on a tugboat, the cube will pass the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, One World Trade Center and the Empire State Building.
Puzzle enthusiasts can catch the cube at the waterfront promenade at Liberty State Park. It will arrive at the statue at 7 a.m., travel up the Hudson towards Hoboken’s Pier A and head back to Staten Island by 10.
The cube is an extension of the Liberty Science Center’s Rubik’s Cube exhibition, Beyond Rubik’s Cube, which has been on view at the Jersey City museum since April. The cube’s journey will also recognize the July 13 birthday of Erno Rubik, the toy’s creator.